Code word – Canttot http://canttot.com/ Thu, 29 Sep 2022 00:22:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://canttot.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/cropped-icon-32x32.png Code word – Canttot http://canttot.com/ 32 32 Reviews | How Democrats can win on crime in the midterm elections https://canttot.com/reviews-how-democrats-can-win-on-crime-in-the-midterm-elections/ Thu, 29 Sep 2022 00:22:00 +0000 https://canttot.com/reviews-how-democrats-can-win-on-crime-in-the-midterm-elections/ It was not inevitable that Republican candidates would spend the final weeks of the 2022 midterm campaign running tens of thousands of harsh and often demagogic ads attacking Democrats on violence and policing. At the start of the summer, Republicans believed inflation, especially soaring gas prices, and a general disaffection with President Biden would drag […]]]>

It was not inevitable that Republican candidates would spend the final weeks of the 2022 midterm campaign running tens of thousands of harsh and often demagogic ads attacking Democrats on violence and policing. At the start of the summer, Republicans believed inflation, especially soaring gas prices, and a general disaffection with President Biden would drag them to midterm victory.

But then gas pump prices began to drop, the conservative Supreme Court boosted abortion-rights supporters by overturning Roe vs. Wadeand Biden’s ratings began to improve as parts of his platform came to life and were passed by Congress.

“In an emergency, break glass,” read signs on old fire alarm boxes. Republicans are hoping crime will be their biggest problem this year.

As Annie Linskey and Colby Itkowitz reported in The Post this week, GOP candidates and allied groups ran about 53,000 crime ads in the first three weeks of September, compared to 29,000 crime ads in August.

Navin Nayak, president of the Center for American Progress Action Fund, saw this coming. “There was no doubt that in the fall, Republicans would go for the same type of playbook they had been using for 25 years, which tries to scare voters into the Republican column by accusing Democrats of crime” , Nayak said in an interview this week. “And, you know, at a time when crime rates were actually going up across the country, we knew that would be even more salient.”

Thus, for five months, Democratic strategists have been quietly preparing for the Republican attack on crime. In the spring, Nayak’s progressive organization assembled a group of Democratic pollsters — Hart Research, Global Strategy Group and Impact Research — to assess how Democrats should react and what arguments might not only protect party candidates, but also empower them. to go on the attack.

Crime has been an inescapable Republican issue since at least the 1968 presidential campaign, when Richard M. Nixon attacked the Supreme Court’s liberal criminal justice rulings for “weakening the forces of peace relative to the criminal forces of this world.” country “.

And while Nixon criticized “those who say law and order is the code word for racism,” many GOP ads around the issue over the past half-century — and this year — have had what can (with in many cases excessive politeness) be called racial overtones.

Crime may be a particularly potent issue for Republicans this year for an additional reason: its potential as a wedge to split the Democratic coalition.

Democrats, led by Biden, overwhelmingly rejected the “defund the police” slogan that arose in response to police killings of unarmed black men dramatized by the May 2020 killing of George Floyd. didn’t stop the GOP from snagging the idea at all. Democrats. Regardless, moderates and liberals have come up against sometimes stark differences over the importance the party should place on tackling crime versus the urgency of fighting for radical police reform. and the criminal justice system.

Nayak’s work is part of an urgent democratic quest for consensus. He insists the one thing party candidates cannot do is ignore public fear of rising crime.

“When you’re not talking about a voter concern and the other side is talking to them, it… amplifies your vulnerability on the issue,” he said. “It’s really important for candidates to remind them that we care about public safety first, that we see an important role for police and law enforcement in keeping communities safe.”

Once that threshold is reached, Nayak said, his group’s research shows that voters respond to Democratic arguments that emphasize both “accountability” (for those who commit crimes) and “prevention” ( including tougher gun laws and support for mental health and addictions treatment programs).

Republicans, according to CAP research, are highly vulnerable to arguments about crime prevention, especially about guns. The case Democrats have to make against the GOP, Nayak said, is this: “They’re not doing anything to actually stop crime from happening in the first place. They are cutting programs that actually help people with mental health or addictions programs. They… are flooding communities with guns and making it easier for people who commit crimes to get guns.

The challenge facing campaigns is how to avoid spending so much time pushing the other side’s issues that your own strongest arguments get lost. Nayak says he’s not calling on Democrats to give “disproportionate” importance to crime. They should, he says, continue to push their edge on abortion rights, Medicare and Social Security.

But sometimes the art of political judo can turn an opponent’s perceived advantage into a weakness. Nayak thinks this can happen to prevent street violence. “We have no reason to feel defensive about this issue,” he said. “Democrats are concerned about crime. We need to talk about it more. »

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VPD: Fraudsters scam thousands of seniors in Vancouver https://canttot.com/vpd-fraudsters-scam-thousands-of-seniors-in-vancouver/ Tue, 27 Sep 2022 02:04:56 +0000 https://canttot.com/vpd-fraudsters-scam-thousands-of-seniors-in-vancouver/ Vancouver police say more and more seniors have been cheated out of thousands of dollars in recent weeks and are asking people to remain vigilant. In previous incidents, suspects will convince elderly people that their loved ones risk jail time unless police are given bail. Scammers will also tell victims how to get large sums […]]]>

Vancouver police say more and more seniors have been cheated out of thousands of dollars in recent weeks and are asking people to remain vigilant.

In previous incidents, suspects will convince elderly people that their loved ones risk jail time unless police are given bail. Scammers will also tell victims how to get large sums of money from their financial institutions. Once they get the money out, the suspects arrange for a bogus courier to pick it up in person or have it mailed to them, a press release explains.

“Fraudsters continue to tug at the heartstrings of the elderly,” says VPD Cnst. Jason Doucette. “Using high-pressure tactics, the scammers convince the senior that their loved one has been arrested and needs bail to avoid going to jail.”

Police are also asking bank workers to monitor “unusual withdrawals” from their regular elderly customers. However, “speaking directly with seniors about these widespread scams is the best line of defense,” he adds.

“Often, scammers will convince their victims not to tell others by suggesting there is a gag order in place, or telling them to use a code word when handing over money.”

The Vancouver Police Department encourages anyone with information about this scam to file a report.

If this is an ongoing crime or there is an immediate safety concern, please call 911. If the suspect has already left, please call the VPD non-emergency line at 604-717-3321 .

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Climate hawk Sean Casten flew 6,000 miles and stayed in a luxury European hotel to fight global warming https://canttot.com/climate-hawk-sean-casten-flew-6000-miles-and-stayed-in-a-luxury-european-hotel-to-fight-global-warming/ Sat, 24 Sep 2022 09:02:56 +0000 https://canttot.com/climate-hawk-sean-casten-flew-6000-miles-and-stayed-in-a-luxury-european-hotel-to-fight-global-warming/ Democrats Casten’s flights emitted more than 313,000 pounds of carbon Representative Sean Casten (D., Ill.) Collin Anderson • September 24, 2022 5:00 a.m. Illinois Democratic Congressman Sean Casten, who has called the climate ‘crisis’ a ‘code red emergency’, walked about 6,000 miles and stayed in a luxury European hotel to fight global warming climate, according […]]]>

Casten’s flights emitted more than 313,000 pounds of carbon

Representative Sean Casten (D., Ill.)

Collin Anderson • September 24, 2022 5:00 a.m.

Illinois Democratic Congressman Sean Casten, who has called the climate ‘crisis’ a ‘code red emergency’, walked about 6,000 miles and stayed in a luxury European hotel to fight global warming climate, according to House’s revelations.

Casten in late August and early September accompanied the Aspen Institute on the think tank’s congress trip to Reykjavík, Iceland, which aimed to provide members with advice “on issues of public policy as they relate to problem solving energy and climate,” according to the Democrat’s trip. disclosures. The trip saw Casten fly business class from Chicago to Reykjavík, Iceland, and back — a trek that totals 5,888 miles and over 313,000 pounds of carbon, given that planes produce an average of 53.3 pounds of carbon dioxide. of carbon per mile driven. The Aspen Institute also provided Casten with accommodation at the Grand Hotel Reykjavík – a four-star luxury hotel that includes a “magnificent spa” and a “lovely candlelit lounge” – and private dining for a total cost of nearly $5. 000 dollars.

Casten, who is known as the “fierce climate hawk” in Congress, said members of Congress “have a duty to do everything we can” to provide “our children and grandchildren” with a “planet livable”. In the case of his trip to Iceland, however, Casten certainly didn’t need to travel thousands of miles on a gas-guzzling flight to meet many of the climate “leaders” assembled by the Aspen Institute. According to the trip program, the majority of the “academics” Casten has met are based in America. A pair of “panel discussions” on the first day of the trip, for example, are expected to feature Sherri Goodman, senior scientist at the Polar Institute, Meghan O’Sullivan of Harvard University and Rajiv Shah, president of the Rockefeller Foundation. , all based in the United States. .

Casten is far from the only prominent liberal climate activist on the Hill who has an admiration for foreign travel in the name of fighting global warming. John Kerry flew more than 180,000 miles in his role as President Joe Biden’s climate czar – those flights emitted more than 9.5 million pounds of carbon, the Free Washington Beacon reported in September. Kerry, who has called climate change an “existential crisis…,” also owns a private jet worth an estimated $4.5 million and has made at least 48 trips since Biden took office. The Biden administration official defended his private jet trip, saying “it’s the only choice for someone like me, who is traveling the world to win this battle.”

Casten did not return a request for comment. Beyond his Icelandic excursion, the Democrat has managed to secure hundreds of billions of dollars in green energy spending while keeping up to $500,000 in a green energy company that will likely benefit from that spending.

Casten, his most recent financial disclosure, earned up to $50,000 in “partnership revenue” in 2021 from his significant stake in Greenleaf Power, a Sacramento-based green energy company that sells “neutral electricity in carbon” to utility companies. Democrats’ so-called Cut Inflation Act, which funnels nearly $400 billion into green energy initiatives and is not expected to have “a measurable impact on inflation,” allocates about $30 billion dollars to “utility and electric utility grant and loan programs” that get “clean electricity” from companies like Greenleaf. Casten called the bill a “historic victory for families” in a statement that did not disclose his investment in Greenleaf.

Casten, who was born in Dublin, joined Congress in 2019 and has since voted with Biden 99% of the time. The Democrat will face Republican fighter veteran and Orland Park Mayor Keith Pekau in November after both candidates emerged from their double-digit June primaries. Casten has raised $3.4 million compared to $437,000 for Pekau as of June 30.

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Adoring Adarra – VirginiaLiving.com https://canttot.com/adoring-adarra-virginialiving-com/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 04:12:12 +0000 https://canttot.com/adoring-adarra-virginialiving-com/ Attentive service and a Basque-inspired menu make it an unmissable address. Step into Adarra in the Jackson Ward neighborhood of Richmond and you’ll feel a wave of tranquility. The lights are dimmed, the music ambient, and the entire staff of 11 is working to ensure your experience is smooth and hassle-free. “You’re in an extension […]]]>

Attentive service and a Basque-inspired menu make it an unmissable address.

Step into Adarra in the Jackson Ward neighborhood of Richmond and you’ll feel a wave of tranquility. The lights are dimmed, the music ambient, and the entire staff of 11 is working to ensure your experience is smooth and hassle-free.

“You’re in an extension of our home in Adarra,” says Lyne Doetzer, co-owner and dining room maestro. “We wanted a place where the restaurant could come in and sigh, sit, relax and have fun.” The Doetzers see their role as employees who happen to own the place, and you’ll find them there — Randy commanding the kitchen and Lyne pouring glasses of natural wine — reliably, on every visit.


Straddling Spain and France

named one of Squire magazine’s best new restaurants in 2020, Adarra offers a Basque-influenced menu, blending Spanish and French techniques and ingredients, such as Espelette pepper a paprika-esque spice. The menu offers a mix of tapas-style small plates and larger dishes with stewed beans, stewed lamb, and seasoned seafood.

Inspired by visits to the Basque region, a region that straddles Spain and France, the Doetzers named their restaurant after the mountain in the Spanish town of San Sebastián. “Basque cuisine is so good because it puts so much emphasis on fresh, simply prepared food,” says Randy Doetzer. “We follow their ethos, the cultural demand for better and higher quality things.”

In the “Cured & Pickled” section of the menu, there are no bad choices, but the Spicy Iberian Chorizo has a special way of preparing your palate for the journey ahead. A must for tapas, the Pintos Gildas are skewers of marinated peppers, oil-soaked anchovies and olives, served with an ounce of Amontillado Sherry, another clever dish from which to embark on a night of bold flavors.


Deep flavors, rendered with love

While skate wing and stuffed calamari were offered in Adarra’s early days, the kitchen has added canned fish to the menu, embracing the European obsession with upscale and craftsmanship. preservedoften recognizable by their captivating label designs.

This centuries-old Spanish craft of keeping seafood at its peak of freshness is as far removed from the canned foods of our childhood as Wagyu beef is from Vienna sausages. And Adarra’s six chefs, crammed like sardines themselves into a tiny kitchen, have a way of coaxing every morsel of salty, savory flavor out of those cans.

Take for example the sardines swimming in escabeche, a spicy carmine sauce with Spanish paprika. They are served with toasted bread, which works wonderfully both as a vehicle for the small fish and as a sponge for the sauce. Presented simply, the beauty of the dish is in the restraint – the decision not to include is just as important as what appears on the plate. Quality fish, bread, sauce. Do.

Adarra’s sauces fall into the “to drink” category, but neither does the smoked butter that accompanies Natural navajas, a special knife. Whenever it is offered, it sells out quickly.

Beyond preserved, there is another world to explore. In the warm bowl of smoked mussels, plump shellfish mingle with Serrano ham and the soft jazz of melted alliums – leeks. The Ajillo Shrimps worth every messy second of shipping the head off and ripping the meat out of a butter-glazed shell. Plan to have dinner with a friend who won’t mind if you lick the garlic (ajillo) and fingertip parsley, because that’s exactly what you’ll want to do.

Guiso is like a code word for deep, lovingly rendered flavors, and the Guiso de Corderoa sultry stew of merguez – a kind of lamb sausage – with white beans and potatoes delivers on that promise.


Intuitive wine pairings

On my last visit, Lyne whispered to me some Sardinian wines I should try, and after polishing off a glass of bright and crisp Cava Oriol Rossell Brut Nature, I let her know I was ready. But was I? The wine, a Deminera de Sa Defenza, hit me with a touch of salt and kept me in its tannic, gripping grip until I emptied the glass.

Lyne described the next selection, a Tresbingias, as the twin wine of the previous glass, but the two could not have been more different, and the second glass was more reminiscent of the Guiso vibes, with a lingering smoky finish that still haunts me.

Adarra’s wine program is a true labor of love, born in equal parts from the Doetzers, both sommeliers, and skilfully managed by Lyne and her front desk team. “What we’ve done is very personal,” Lyne says of her selection of nearly 300 bottles. The menu features around four wines by the glass, and the rest – natural wines from around the world – live in Doetzer’s Rolodex.

“Wine is like perfume,” says Lyne. “It’s subjective. We ask, ‘What are you in the mood to drink tonight?’ Based on this information, she guesses three bottles to choose from. “And we bring someone into a wine they may not have known they wanted. It comes down to reading our guests. It’s not my job to overwhelm you with information. I’m your guide. It’s about establishing levels of trust.


Captivating salty notes

The cocktails, an efficient collection of five drinks, reflect the ethos of the food and wine menus – from bright, herbal White Nights, with Aquavit and bergamot liqueur, to robust and invigorating Long Way Home, with mezcal and mole bitters.

Likewise, the dessert menu offers the right conclusion. A simmering Basque cheesecake, drizzled with oil and sprinkled with sea salt – more cheese dish than dessert – invites the guest to keep returning to those mesmerizing salty notes in their mind.

Adarra has cultivated a reputation for serving the unexpected – from orange wine to canned squid – while always accommodating the needs of each guest. You may notice, during your meal, that the chefs gaze intently from the kitchen into the dining room, when not laser-focused on plates to compose. “We look at body language. We look at what comes up on the plates. We try to gauge the situations,” notes Chief Doetzer. “Everyone who comes here needs something different from us, and we have to give it to them.”


This article originally appeared in August 2022 publish.

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Lloyd: Browns collapse against Jets worst loss in 25 years https://canttot.com/lloyd-browns-collapse-against-jets-worst-loss-in-25-years/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 02:03:45 +0000 https://canttot.com/lloyd-browns-collapse-against-jets-worst-loss-in-25-years/ John Johnson III stood in disbelief in front of his locker, clutching a towel around his waist and repeating the same line to anyone who would listen. “They should make a movie out of it,” he said. “The last four minutes should be a movie.” “A horror movie,” I said, and he forced an exasperated […]]]>

John Johnson III stood in disbelief in front of his locker, clutching a towel around his waist and repeating the same line to anyone who would listen.

“They should make a movie out of it,” he said. “The last four minutes should be a movie.”

“A horror movie,” I said, and he forced an exasperated laugh.

The Cleveland Browns have lost 249 games since returning to the NFL in 1999, but never quite like this. There were plenty of outrageous moments at this stadium – fans throwing bottles onto the pitch, Myles Garrett swinging a helmet, Dwayne Rudd throwing one too – but not this.

A franchise that has drowned its fanbase for 30 years hit the towel and bucket again on Sunday.

In a way, it was the worst loss of all.

There have been bigger blowouts, of course, and far more embarrassing moments. But to snatch defeat from the clutches of victory like that? With fans celebrating as they walked out of the stadium with two touchdowns on the two-minute warning, thinking they were 2-0 down for the first time in decades? By the time those poor folks got to their cars and turned on the postgame spectacle, the Browns had inexplicably lost to the Jets 31-30.

Only two losses compare: a similar meltdown in Chicago in 2001 and Rudd’s helmet toss against Kansas City in 2002. The loss to the Bears was on the road and this Browns team was in its third year of existence without playoff expectations. The game against the Chiefs was close throughout and Kansas City even led with three minutes left.

But this? The Browns were in charge all afternoon. They haven’t closed for the second time in as many weeks.

It’s the kind of meltdown that gets someone fired.

“We have to finish and do the things that win you games and we haven’t done that,” Browns coach Kevin Stefanski said. “Everyone is going to want to point fingers and say, ‘Whose fault was that? Put it on everyone. It’s all of us. Me, coaches and players. It’s everyone.”

Oh, don’t worry. We will point the finger, especially the defense. But I have plenty of fingers to go around.

How do you write the script for an NFL horror movie? Here is a four-part Cleveland tragedy.

I. The sideline

I mumbled under my breath as Kareem Hunt went overboard near the two-minute warning, “What’s he doing?” It seemed harmless at the time. The Browns were leading 24-17 and the Jets were out of timeouts. Still, Hunt had picked up the first down. Just fall within the limits, let the clock tick until the two minute warning, take three knees and go celebrate.

Instead, the Browns had a first down 12 minutes and 2 seconds behind the Jets.

Stefanski’s code word for his traffic jams, at least it was two years ago, was “no mas”. It’s what he called it in 2020 during a game in Houston when the Browns were leading 10-7 in the final minute and the Texans were out of timeouts. Nick Chubb’s orders that day were to take the first down but not score so the Browns could run out of time.

Chubb followed instructions, ripping a 59-yard run before going out at 1. The Browns took a knee and killed the rest of the clock.

In a similar situation on Sunday, Stefanski did not give the order. On a first down from the Jets 12-yard line, Chubb broke free and scored to give the Browns a 30-17 lead.

“We had the advantage of having the opportunity on that last Chubb touchdown,” Jets coach Robert Saleh said. “It just gave us an (opportunity).”

Chubb could have come out again at 1 and the Browns could have killed the last two minutes and celebrated the win. Stefanski is usually two steps ahead in his thinking, but he missed it by not asking Chubb to come down, and Chubb missed it by not doing it himself, scoring his third touchdown instead. the day.

“It’s a scenario where it’s up to me to communicate it to the group,” Stefanski said. “We have already done that. That said, we have to close this match.

Saleh said the Jets will use Chubb’s score as a teachable moment in their Friday strategy sessions.

“It’s going to come across as a teachable time for us on Friday,” he said. “I’m sure Coach Stefanski is very, very detailed. I’m sure it’s in their vocabulary and I’m sure it’s just one of those times. They scored and echoed on the helmet was ‘They gave us a chance, let’s see what happens.’ ”

II. The kick

Cade York was Cleveland’s new darling after hitting a 58-yard field goal last week to beat Carolina in its first professional game. But he missed the extra point on Chubb’s touchdown on Sunday that seemed harmless at the time but ultimately made the difference in the game.

Cade regularly kicks over 60 yards in warm-ups, but he just pushed the kick wide on the extra point.

“I thought I kicked him pretty good,” York said. “I don’t know why it took off on me. … You just can’t get ahead of yourself in the NFL. The games are so close that you have to do everything you can.

III. Special teams

Cleveland special teams were terrible all afternoon, but especially late. The Jets executed a fake punt that resulted in their first touchdown after the Browns defense stopped them. Then York missed the extra point and the hands team failed to recover a game-winning kick despite knowing the direction he was heading.

Stefanski called a timeout after the Jets lined up. The Browns expected the Jets’ Braden Mann to aim left. There were no surprises, no gimmicks. Just a standard kick that Mann placed perfectly between Jeremiah Owusu-Koramoah and David Bell. Amari Cooper was slow to get there and the Jets recovered.

Saleh said he knew the Jets were going to score again after recovering the kick.

“Once that happened there was no doubt that we would score once we got the ball back,” he said.

IV. Defense

All of the above errors as standalone errors are of little significance to the overall result. Added together in a perfect storm of incompetence, this demonstrates a worst-case scenario of what can happen when one mistake is compounded by another.

And yet, none of this would have cost the Browns a win had they been able to stop. Just one stop. The defense, which was expected to be a force at the start of the season, is instead the biggest mystery.

How can this keep happening? Particularly behind in games?

By my count, the defense gave up 172 fourth-quarter yards and 17 points last week at Carolina after the Browns dominated the game for three quarters. It happened again on Sunday. The Jets totaled 161 yards in the fourth quarter — 119 over the final two minutes — after the game seemed out of reach.

These are numbers that will get people fired, especially here with emotional and reactionary owners.

Just as the Panthers’ Robbie Anderson escaped last week for a 75-yard touchdown on a missed play, so did Corey Davis on Sunday. Joe Flacco’s 66-yard lift to Davis on missed coverage drew the Jets to 30-24 and brought them to life.

Stefanski wouldn’t assess blame, but a source with knowledge of the defensive play appeal said Denzel Ward blew cover. He was in the wrong cover. Given Ward’s recent $100 million contract extension, such mental errors are not acceptable.

“It was a bust. Not everyone was playing the same call,” Johnson III said. “Communication is sending and receiving. Guys send. Some don’t receive.”

The Jets moved the ball just as easily after recovering the onside kick. It wasn’t as dramatic as a missed coverage, but the guys were open all over the field. Flacco needed nine plays and a minute to get them back in the end zone for a stunning win.

With another game Thursday against the Steelers, the Browns don’t have much time to clean up any defensive gaffes. They will probably practice once, Tuesday, before the game against Pittsburgh. These are usually more walkthroughs than full practices, but we’ll see how the fallout from this affects the practice week. Jadeveon Clowney limped off the field and looks questionable at best for Thursday. His absence would be another blow to a team that can’t afford to go wrong defensively much more.

Communication shouldn’t be that difficult, but the Browns are 58 yards away from being 0-2.

“We have a young football team, and unfortunately that youth has sometimes shown itself here,” Stefanski said. “We have to grow very quickly.”

(Photo by Nick Chubb: Scott Galvin/USA Today)

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Montana’s educator code of ethics partially revised, but without the word ‘fairness’ – Daily Montanan https://canttot.com/montanas-educator-code-of-ethics-partially-revised-but-without-the-word-fairness-daily-montanan/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 21:51:29 +0000 https://canttot.com/montanas-educator-code-of-ethics-partially-revised-but-without-the-word-fairness-daily-montanan/ A motion calling on the Montana Board of Public Education to adopt an updated code of ethics for educators — with the word “equity” included — didn’t get a second this week. Instead, the board passed a separate motion on Thursday to agree to some changes but refer the portion containing the term “equity” to […]]]>

A motion calling on the Montana Board of Public Education to adopt an updated code of ethics for educators — with the word “equity” included — didn’t get a second this week.

Instead, the board passed a separate motion on Thursday to agree to some changes but refer the portion containing the term “equity” to an advisory board. He did so without the support of President Tammy Lacey, who said she was puzzled and saddened to see the important concept of education politicized.

“I think we have to be careful with the message we send to our educators,” Lacey said.

She said teachers’ work is rooted in equity, meeting children where they are, supporting them and moving them forward, “the very definition of the word equity”.

“And we can’t even include it in our code of ethics,” she said. “I think that says something about us.”

The code of ethics is updated approximately every five years, and this time an advisory board’s decision to insert the term “equity” into the code caused controversy.

Republican Gov. Greg Gianforte criticized the proposed change earlier this year and called for “equality” instead. Lt. Gov. Kristen Juras pushed the board at a meeting to take action on the advisory board’s authority to update the code even though the board hadn’t notified the public in advance.

(After a lawsuit by the Daily Montana, the council re-voted with public notice, though it did not admit wrongdoing. The council voted that its advisory board does not have the power to establish policies, and the council itself “accepts” recommendations, but that does not give them the force of a policy.)

At this week’s meeting, Lacey said the board received substantial and compelling feedback in favor of fairness. She also said citizens were “extremely appalled” that the council was considering scrapping the term.

However, Sharyl Allen, deputy superintendent of the Office of Public Instruction, said she appreciated “that the three Bs were not included” in the motion that was ultimately approved.

This proposal for “three Bs” or “3Bs” was to delete “understands and respects diversity” and replace it with “demonstrates an understanding of educational equity and inclusion and respects human diversity” in reference to the ethical educator.

“Last time I checked the constitution it was equal opportunity for all students, not based on equity,” Allen said.

Board member Madalyn Quinlan’s motion to adopt the advisory board’s revisions, which included the word “fairness,” died without a second. Then board member Renee Rasmussen moved a motion to pass further changes but return 3B to the advisory board, and it passed, although Lacey dissented.

In a public comment, Montana educator Rob Watson shared the story of his family’s upbringing in Montana and how his mother’s teacher understood the concept of equity. He said the game was stacked against her.

English was not spoken at home and by most standards her family lived in poverty, he said. His parents were undereducated, he said, and they were raising six half-Mexican, half-Filipino children in rural Montana.

“I’m here to tell you that equal access and opportunity was not enough,” said Watson, who previously served on the advisory board that backed adding fairness to the code.

However, in a one-room school, “Mrs. Mosby” not only gave Watson’s mother extra tutoring, the teacher also taught her grandmother to read because she knew it would have a direct impact on his children.

“Ms. Mosby was a hero, but she’s not unique,” Watson said. expectations to ensure they meet the unique needs of each child.”

Watson is the head of Montana’s school trustees, but he said SAM hasn’t taken a position on the code and is speaking as a Montanese.

At the 1972 Constitutional Convention, he said delegates debated the phrase “full educational potential” and that some were nervous about the word “full”. But he said the wording makes it clear it’s a goal, not a mandate, and he thinks the inclusion of the phrase shows the concept of equity was important to delegates.

“Not only did they ensure equal educational opportunity, but they also set themselves the goal of establishing a system that would develop the full educational opportunity of every person,” Watson said. “And that’s the very definition of fairness.”

Years ago, he said delegates had not given in to their fears of including “full educational potential” in the constitution, and he asked Council members not to give in to their fears either. .

The Certification Standards and Practices Advisory Council is expected to take over the code in October.

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Crowd learns firsthand about Jane Collective, an underground abortion network in pre-Roe Chicago https://canttot.com/crowd-learns-firsthand-about-jane-collective-an-underground-abortion-network-in-pre-roe-chicago/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 03:54:00 +0000 https://canttot.com/crowd-learns-firsthand-about-jane-collective-an-underground-abortion-network-in-pre-roe-chicago/ CHICAGO (CBS) — In pre-Roe c. Wade, when abortion was a crime — and even spreading information about abortions in Illinois was a crime — emerged the most unlikely villains. The Jane Collective was a group of Chicago women who formed an underground society and helped thousands of women access abortions in the 1960s and […]]]>

CHICAGO (CBS) — In pre-Roe c. Wade, when abortion was a crime — and even spreading information about abortions in Illinois was a crime — emerged the most unlikely villains.

The Jane Collective was a group of Chicago women who formed an underground society and helped thousands of women access abortions in the 1960s and early 1970s. The roots of the Jane Collective date back to 1965, when University of Chicago student Heather Booth helped a friend find a safe abortion provider — and soon started getting calls from other women looking for the same thing.

HBO’s new documentary “The Janes” tells their story and screened for free Tuesday night at Holstein Park, 2200 N. Oakley Ave. in Bucktown. People got to hear first-hand from members of the Jane Collective – who shared their stories of why they felt compelled to break the law – and how their work is still relevant today.

“We provided illegal abortions in the city of Chicago,” said Jane Collective member Eileen Smith.

When he was 20 and living in Chicago, Smith found a phone number for Jane in an underground newspaper. “Jane” was the code word for the secret network of women offering abortions – officially called the Women’s Liberation Abortion Counseling Service.

“There was a message, ‘Pregnant? Don’t you want to be? Call Jane,'” Smith said. “So I called.”

Smith was one of more than 11,000 women who had illegal abortions in Chicago before Roe v. Wade did guarantee the right to an abortion in 1973. She then volunteered with the grassroots group.

Dorie Barron too.

“Nobody wants to break the law when they’re trying to help people, but we had no choice,” Barron said.

Tuesday night’s free screening of “The Janes” was hosted by members of the community, who say the Janes’ story is more relevant today than ever with the current Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe v. Wade.

“We’re back, you know? said Linda Kanoski. “We’re going back to where we were before Roe.”

“Anger, grief that we have to deal with these same issues again,” Smith added.

While abortion was illegal in Illinois before Roe, it now remains legal under state law in Roe’s absence. And in recent months, access to abortion has polarized parts of the country.

The Division of the Question on full screen during neighborhood movie night. Promotional signs were vandalized in the days leading up to the event.

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“I feel like cruelty has almost become the norm, and when I see it, I have to get up,” said screening organizer Jean Alan.

After all, standing up to authority and opposition is what the Janes choose to do. Seven of the Janes were arrested in 1972 after an apartment raid – Jeanne Galatzer-Levy, Abby Parisers, Judy Pildes, Madeleine Schwenk, Martha Scott and Diane Stevens. They were charged with 11 counts of conspiracy to commit an abortion – and each faced 110 years in prison, the documentary points out.

The charges were dropped after the Roe v. Wade decision in 1973.

“It was an incredible lesson in brotherhood,” Barron said.

“People were hurting, and people were getting abortions anyway — and so to be able to do it in a way that was respectful to women,” Smith said.

Along with the screening on Tuesday evening, several women’s health organizations came to Holstein Park on Tuesday evening. The organizers we spoke with say more than anything, they hope the event was a learning opportunity.

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What is a Church? The CFL tells how to say | Allen Matkins https://canttot.com/what-is-a-church-the-cfl-tells-how-to-say-allen-matkins/ Mon, 12 Sep 2022 15:26:07 +0000 https://canttot.com/what-is-a-church-the-cfl-tells-how-to-say-allen-matkins/ The word “church” has an interesting ancestry. It most likely started as a Germanic word that entered the Greek language and then transitioned into English. The Greek word, κυριακός, means for or of an owner, master or lord (κύριος means master or lord, as in kyrie eleison, Lord have mercy). Whatever the etymological roots of […]]]>

The word “church” has an interesting ancestry. It most likely started as a Germanic word that entered the Greek language and then transitioned into English. The Greek word, κυριακός, means for or of an owner, master or lord (κύριος means master or lord, as in kyrie eleison, Lord have mercy).

Whatever the etymological roots of the word, it is quite another matter to define what a church is. California funding law does not attempt to define “church”, but it does specify how to determine what constitutes a “church”:

What constitutes a “church” is to be determined on the basis of the following criteria, none of which is of decisive weight: a separate legal existence; a recognized creed and form of worship; a definite and distinct ecclesiastical government; a formal code of doctrine and discipline; a distinct religious history; membership not associated with another religion or denomination; a comprehensive organization of ordained ministers ministering to their congregations; ordained ministers selected after completing prescribed courses of study; a literature in its own right; established places of worship; regular congregations; regular religious services; schools for the religious instruction of youth; and schools for the preparation of his ministers.

Cal. Fin. Code § 22061(b)(2). Readers may recognize these factors as being substantially similar to the factors listed in the Internal Revenue Service’s Tax Guide for Churches and Religious Organizations.

Some readers may wonder why the CFL cares about churches. This is because the CFL exempts “nonprofit church extension funds” which are defined as “a nonprofit organization affiliated with a churchwhich is formed for the purpose of making loans to the congregational organization or organizations of this church for the acquisition of sites, new facilities or the improvement of existing facilities, purchased for the benefit of the congregational organization of the church”. Cal. Fin. Code § 22061(b)(1).

Although the word “church” is commonly used in reference to the Christian religion, the CFL factors listed above do not prima facie exclude other religious traditions.

[View source.]

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‘The Magician’s Study’ is a hidden Las Vegas gem | Company https://canttot.com/the-magicians-study-is-a-hidden-las-vegas-gem-company/ Sun, 11 Sep 2022 04:15:00 +0000 https://canttot.com/the-magicians-study-is-a-hidden-las-vegas-gem-company/ In “The Magician’s Study” you will find tricks that are effective in any Las Vegas magic show. A small treasure box opens on its own, then a white handkerchief flies off and falls into an empty carboy. An audience member signs a $50 bill and hands it to the star of the show. Later, he […]]]>

In “The Magician’s Study” you will find tricks that are effective in any Las Vegas magic show. A small treasure box opens on its own, then a white handkerchief flies off and falls into an empty carboy. An audience member signs a $50 bill and hands it to the star of the show. Later, he reappears after that same audience member opens a nut.

The magician places coins under playing cards on a black felt. These pieces move around the table, under different cards and seemingly on their own. The crowd gasps, shouts “No way” and laughs in disbelief.

There’s a unique magic to it, too, as the magician – known in public only as The Rabbit – skillfully engages his audience. His sleight of hand is enhanced by his sneaky sides. Similar to an Olympic slalom skier, the star meanders around her guests, never knowing what they might scream.

The Rabbit shows a card and asks: “Is this your card, the three of clubs? For no apparent reason, a man in the middle of the audience, his arms folded skeptically, shouts: “Allegedly!

Maybe the man is drunk, late Saturday night. There’s no doubt he’s verbally outmatched, as The Rabbit replies, “No, it’s actually the three of clubs.” A group of women off to the side also start shouting “Apparently!” and The Rabbit shakes his head, “Oh, you too?”

Thanks to this relaxed conversation, different with each show, The Magician’s Study is an intimate and interactive experience. This is true even in a city where these terms seem to define any recent production or attraction. Thirty-two people were seated at a weekend performance. It’s actually a big band, at full capacity (well, there were eight no-shows) in a production that grew almost entirely through word-of-mouth.

The show is played in one location now, but The Rabbit has ideas to expand into multiple studies, all designed to be supportive of close-up magick. He is likely to recruit and train more than one magician, including a woman, to add to the roster.

For these purposes, the location of the performance and the identity of the performer will not be disclosed. You will thank me later. What can be disclosed is that The Magician’s Study performs in Las Vegas at 7 and 9:30 p.m. on Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays.

The Rabbit himself is a skilled magician, excellent in the art of sleight of hand. He loses his white rabbit face at the start of the show, so you watch an identifiable performer. If and when you shake his hand, check your watch or bracelet. He might have run away with it, so he could show it to the public a few minutes later.

Access to this jewel of the show is by invitation only and not for sale to the general public. Go to themagiciansstudy.com and follow the instructions. Those who are invited receive a code word in the FAQ section, leading to the ticketing platform.

The Bunny had released The Magician’s Study before COVID-19, then resumed last September, barely filling single shows on Fridays and Saturdays (I attended one performance with six people, one of whom was the director of the Drai’s nightclub, Dustin Drai). Now it goes eight times a week, about 40 people per performance.

The series star came up with the idea about six years ago. He was eager to bring the “intimate” and “interactive” experiences to life.

“There are other shows in town that claim to be interactive, and the artist literally comes out and says, ‘What was your favorite toy growing up?’ and doesn’t even listen to the response,” says The Rabbit. “He just starts spouting his jokes. I looked at this and thought, ‘You’re really not in touch with them.’ when people leave The Study, they connected with me at the end of the night.

The Bunny’s encounter almost feels like a celebratory post-game scene for a winning team. The bunny remembers seeing two people who attended his show long after the performance, as he was leaving the venue. He ran up and said, “Thank you very much for coming. I hope you liked it.”

The following night, this same couple had navigated the maze of the website and were seated in the audience.

“The fact that I said ‘Hi!’ and I took the time to talk to them, it made them want to come back,” says The Rabbit. “It meant so much to them. We developed this so organically. That’s what makes it fun.

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©2022 Las Vegas Review-Journal. Visit reviewjournal.com. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

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KHADC opposes decision to implement CrPC and CPC in tribal areas of Meghalaya https://canttot.com/khadc-opposes-decision-to-implement-crpc-and-cpc-in-tribal-areas-of-meghalaya/ Fri, 09 Sep 2022 05:37:16 +0000 https://canttot.com/khadc-opposes-decision-to-implement-crpc-and-cpc-in-tribal-areas-of-meghalaya/ Shillong, September 9: The Khasi Hills Autonomous District Council (KHADC) on Thursday voiced strong opposition to the state government’s decision to extend the Criminal Procedure Code (CrPC) and Civil Procedure Code (CPC) in the tribal areas of State. This happened a day after the State Cabinet approved the notification about it. “We will not accept […]]]>

Shillong, September 9: The Khasi Hills Autonomous District Council (KHADC) on Thursday voiced strong opposition to the state government’s decision to extend the Criminal Procedure Code (CrPC) and Civil Procedure Code (CPC) in the tribal areas of State.

This happened a day after the State Cabinet approved the notification about it.

“We will not accept the notification as it is contrary to the spirit of subsection 5(3) of the Sixth Schedule which states that the CrPC and the CPC will not apply,” said KHADC chief Titosstarwell Chyne. , to journalists.

Stating that the notification aims to dilute the powers of the district council courts, Chyne said, “The notification makes it clear that the CrPC and the CPC will apply to all courts in Meghalaya, which also includes the district council courts. , subordinate courts and village courts.

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He said the government had gone ahead with approving the notification without considering suggestions made by the district council to include the words “excluding courts established under the Sixth Schedule of the Constitution of India and that these courts shall continue to derive powers under paragraphs 4 and 5 of the Sixth Schedule to the Constitution of India.”

“We have also suggested to the government the need to ensure that the exclusive jurisdiction of the District Council Courts to hear and adjudicate inter-tribal cases in the Tribal Areas is not in any way diluted,” he said.

“Therefore, we totally object and have decided not to accept this part of the Notice as it did not mention the word excluding Sixth Schedule Tribunals,” Chyne added.

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The CEM said the notification in its current form can also be construed that it will also apply to the District Council Courts although it states “that the District Council Courts will continue to derive powers under paragraphs 4 and 5 of the Sixth Schedule to the Constitution of India.”

“We are in need of conferring powers on the Judicial Magistrates of the District Session Courts, but despite the Chief Minister’s assurance that this will not affect the District Council Courts, the notification however says otherwise as the CrPC will be taxed statewide,” he said.

Demanding that the government maintain the notification, the KHADC leader said, “The government should not notify the notification until the issue is resolved.”

He warned: “If the government decides to go ahead with its decision to dilute the powers of the district council courts, it is best for the government to close all the district council courts.

When asked, Chyne said he would call a meeting with all MDCs to make a collective decision next Monday. “We will also meet with the leaders of JHADC and GHADC to decide the matter,” he said.

Meanwhile, the opposition Congress in KHADC has also called on the state government to reconsider its decision and consider exempting the District Council courts from the provisions of the CrPC and the CPC.

“We vehemently oppose the government’s decision as it seeks to wrest judicial powers from the district council courts,” opposition leader PN Syiem told reporters.

“We have therefore requested the government to exempt the Sixth Schedule Tribal Areas from the provisions of the CrPC and the CPC. The government should allow district council courts to only implement the spirit of the CrPC and the CPC,” he said.

He said the government should take into account that it is not easy for the rural poor to defend themselves in district courts due to the exorbitant fees. “We call on the government not to dilute the age-old customary practices that have existed since British times and since independence,” Syiem added.

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